Site Menu

October 10th, 2009 7 comments

Barry Letts (1925-2009)

Barry Letts, producer of Doctor Who through one of its most fondly-remembered periods with Jon Pertwee as the Third Doctor from 1970 to 1974, has died at the age of eighty-four.

Full story on the Doctor Who News page

Only today did we post news of his Autobiography and planned signing which we will leave below…

Barry Letts Who & Me Autobiography

books-autobarryletts

Barry Letts began his screen career as an actor, starring in the Ealing film Scott of the Antarctic and TV dramas such as The Avengers, The Moonstone and Gunpowder Guy in which future Doctor Who actor Patrick Troughton took the lead role. In the 1960s he switched to directing, taking the helm of classic shows such as The Newcomers and Z Cars.

Barry got his first taste of Doctor Who in 1967 when he directed the six-part serial The Enemy of the World. In 1969, he took over as the show’s producer. This was an exciting time for Doctor Who – the show had a new lead actor, and was being broadcast in colour for the first time.

Barry reveals his memories of this era, talking about his relationship with script editor Terrance Dicks and the show’s cast, Jon Pertwee, Katy Manning and Roger Delgado.

Behind-the-scenes gossip, fascinating production detail and witty anecdotes, Who and Me recounts Barry Letts’ journey from struggling actor to successful producer, and the ups and downs of working on Doctor Who during the Jon Pertwee years


7 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

By clicking submit you agree to our terms and conditions (below), we reserve the right to edit or delete inappropriate messages.

Comment rules

The Doctor Who site welcomes constuctive comments related to the news article in question. Links posted in comments may not be displayed. We reserve the right to delete or edit any post entirely at our discretion. If you leave unacceptable comments your IP address will be banned and reported

Click here to read full comments terms and conditions

Twitter

Facebook